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Häufige Krankheitsbilder

Nachfolgend finden Sie als Information eine Auflistung häufiger Krankheitsbilder im Bereich der Inneren Medizin und Kardiologie.

Diesen und weiteren Krankheitsbildern widme ich mich im Rahmen meiner Ordination.

  • Cardiovascular risk check
    A cardiovascular risk check is used to assess the individual risk of cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack , stroke or heart failure. This check-up includes the assessment of various risk factors that can affect the cardiovascular system, as well as the assessment of the overall risk of cardiovascular disease. The risk factors that can be taken into account in a cardiovascular risk check include: 1. High blood pressure: High blood pressure increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. 2. High cholesterol : High levels of LDL cholesterol can lead to atherosclerosis and heart disease. 3. Smoking: Tobacco consumption is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease. 4. Diabetes: Diabetes increases the risk of heart attacks and strokes. 5. Overweight and obesity : A high body mass index (BMI) can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. 6. Lack of physical activity: Lack of exercise can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. 7. Family history : A family history of cardiovascular disease can increase personal risk. 8. Stress : Chronic stress can have a negative impact on the cardiovascular system.
  • ECG
    An electrocardiogram (ECG) is a non-invasive medical test used to record the heart's electrical activity. The ECG provides important information about heart rate , heart rhythm and heart function. It is a commonly performed test to detect heart problems, diagnose cardiac arrhythmias , and check heart health. Here are some important points about electrocardiogram (ECG): 1. Procedure: During an ECG, electrodes are placed on the skin of the patient's chest, arms and legs. These electrodes capture the heart's electrical signals and transmit them to an EKG machine, which graphs the activity. 2. Interpretation: Cardiac arrhythmias, heart attacks , changes in heart rhythm and other heart problems can be detected. The ECG shows the heart's electrical activity in the form of waves called P, Q, R, S and T waves. 3. Heart rate: The ECG provides information about the heart rate, i.e. how many times the heart beats per minute. Heart rate is measured by the distances between QRS complexes. 4. Heart rhythm: The ECG shows the heart rhythm, i.e. whether the heart beats regularly or irregularly. Abnormal rhythms such as atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia can be detected on an EKG. 5. Diagnosis of heart problems: An EKG can provide evidence of various heart problems, including heart attack, cardiac arrhythmias, narrowing of the coronary arteries and other diseases. 6. Routine checkup: An ECG can be done as part of a routine checkup to monitor heart health and detect risk factors early. The electrocardiogram is a valuable diagnostic "tool" to identify and monitor heart problems. It is a quick and painless test that provides important information about heart health. If there are abnormalities on the ECG, further examination or treatment may be necessary.
  • Blood draw
    Blood sampling, also known as blood sampling or venipuncture, is a medical procedure in which blood is removed from a vein. Blood collection is used for various purposes, including diagnostic tests, monitoring health parameters, blood donation or medical treatment. Here is some important information about blood collection: 1. Procedure: A sterile needle is inserted into a vein to take a blood sample. Blood is usually drawn from a vein in the arm, but depending on the purpose of the test, blood may also be taken from other sources. 2. Diagnostic tests: Blood collection is used to collect blood samples for diagnostic tests, including blood counts, cholesterol levels, blood sugar, liver and kidney function tests, infection markers and other laboratory tests. 3. Monitoring of health parameters: Regular blood collection allows monitoring of health parameters such as blood sugar levels, blood pressure, cholesterol levels and other laboratory values. This is important for early detection of disease and monitoring treatments.
  • Echocardiography
    Echocardiography, also known as cardiac ultrasound or cardiac sonography, is a non-invasive diagnostic procedure used to assess the heart structure, function and blood flow. Echocardiography uses high-frequency sound waves to produce detailed images of the heart in real time, allowing doctors to detect and monitor various heart diseases. Purpose of echocardiography: - Assessment of cardiac structure: Echocardiography allows visualization of the heart valves, cardiac chambers, heart valves and heart muscle to detect abnormalities or changes. - Evaluation of cardiac function: Echocardiography measures heart function, including heart pumping function (ejection fraction), heart valve function, and blood flow rates in the heart. - Diagnosis of heart disease: Echocardiography can identify various heart diseases such as heart valve defects, myocardial disease, congenital heart defects, pericardial effusions and other heart problems. Benefits of Echocardiography: - Early detection of heart disease. - Monitoring heart disease and its progression. - Planning and monitoring treatments. - Assessment of cardiac function before and after surgical procedures.
  • Ergometry
    Ergometry, also known as exercise ECG or ergometry test, is a diagnostic procedure used to monitor and evaluate the heart's response to physical stress. During ergometry, the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG) is continuously recorded while he performs physical exercises on a bicycle ergometer. This test makes it possible to assess heart function under stress and identify possible cardiovascular problems. Purpose of ergometry: - Assessment of cardiac function: Ergometry helps to monitor the heart's response to exercise and detect irregularities in the heart rhythm or signs of ischemia (lack of oxygen in the heart). - Diagnosis of heart disease: The stress test can help identify coronary heart disease, cardiac arrhythmias, heart valve problems and other heart diseases. - Assessment of physical performance: Ergometry can also be used to assess the patient's physical fitness and performance. Ergometry process: - Preparation: Before the ergometry test, a resting ECG, blood pressure measurements and, if necessary, an anamnesis are usually carried out. The patient wears electrodes to record the ECG during the test. - Implementation: The patient is placed on the ergometer or treadmill and begins physical exertion, which is gradually increased. Meanwhile, the patient's ECG, blood pressure and symptoms are monitored. - Evaluation: The recorded data is analyzed by a doctor or cardiologist to evaluate the heart's response to stress and identify possible abnormalities. Benefits of ergometry: - Early detection of cardiovascular diseases. - Assessment of physical performance. - Monitoring treatments in cardiac patients. - Setting training goals and training intensities.
  • 24 hour ECG
    A 24-hour ECG, also known as a Holter ECG or Holter ECG, is a test that continuously records the heart's electrical activity over a 24-hour period. Unlike the standard ECG, which provides a snapshot of heart activity, the 24-hour ECG provides a comprehensive assessment of heart rhythm and function throughout an entire day. Here is some important information about the 24-hour ECG: 1. Procedure: During a 24-hour ECG, the patient wears a small wearable device that continuously records heart rate and rhythm. Electrodes are placed on the patient's chest and connected to the recording device. 2. Monitoring period: The 24-hour ECG records heart activity throughout an entire day, including everyday activities, during sleep and during exercise. The patient carries out normal daily activities during the recording. 3. Diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmia: 24-hour ECG is used to diagnose cardiac arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, bradycardia and other irregular heart rhythms. 4. Symptom-related recording: The 24-hour ECG is particularly useful in detecting sporadic symptoms such as dizziness, palpitations or fainting, which may indicate cardiac arrhythmias. 5. Evaluation: After the 24-hour recording is completed, the ECG is evaluated to identify abnormalities in the heart rhythm and make a diagnosis. 6. Benefit: The 24-hour ECG is an important diagnostic procedure for assessing cardiac arrhythmias, especially those that occur only occasionally. It helps identify the cause of symptoms and initiate appropriate treatment.
  • 24 hour blood pressure measurement
    24-hour blood pressure monitoring, also known as ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, is an examination in which a patient's blood pressure is continuously monitored over a 24-hour period. Unlike traditional blood pressure monitoring, which only provides a snapshot in time, 24-hour blood pressure monitoring provides a more accurate assessment of blood pressure throughout the day, including during activity, sleep and rest. Here is some important information about 24-hour blood pressure monitoring: 1. Implementation: During a 24-hour blood pressure measurement, the patient wears a portable blood pressure monitor that automatically measures and records blood pressure at regular intervals. The patient carries out normal daily activities during this time. 2. Monitoring period: 24-hour blood pressure monitoring provides a comprehensive assessment of blood pressure over a whole day, which is helpful in detecting fluctuations and patterns in blood pressure. 3. Diagnosis of high blood pressure: Ambulatory blood pressure measurement is used to diagnose and monitor high blood pressure (hypertension). Elevated blood pressure over a long period of time can be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. 4. Symptom-related measurement: 24-hour blood pressure measurement can also be used in patients with hypertension symptoms such as headaches, dizziness or malaise to monitor blood pressure levels during such episodes. 5. Evaluation: After the 24-hour recording is completed, the blood pressure values are evaluated to analyze the average blood pressure, nocturnal blood pressure drop and other parameters. 6. Benefit: 24-hour blood pressure measurement provides more precise information about blood pressure trends compared to individual measurements and can help to individualize the treatment of high blood pressure. 24-hour blood pressure measurement is an important diagnostic procedure for assessing blood pressure over a long period of time and identifying hypertension and monitoring blood pressure treatment. It allows for a more accurate assessment of blood pressure and can help determine an individual's risk of cardiovascular disease.
  • Spirometry
    Spirometry is a diagnostic test used to measure lung function. A small spirometry, also known as sitting spirometry or resting spirometry, is a simple form of spirometry in which basic pulmonary function parameters are measured while the patient rests in a sitting position. Here is some important information about small spirometry: 1. Procedure: During small spirometry, the patient breathes through a mouthpiece into a spirometer, which measures the amount and speed of air. The patient is instructed to breathe in deeply and then breathe out as quickly and forcefully as possible to record various lung function parameters. 2. Parameters measured: Small spirometry measures various parameters including vital capacity (VC), forced vital capacity (FVC), one-second expiratory volume (FEV1) and the ratio of FEV1 to FVC. These parameters provide information about lung capacity, airways and respiratory flow rate. 3. Diagnosis of lung diseases: Small spirometry is used to diagnose and monitor lung dysfunction such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary fibrosis and other respiratory diseases. 4. Monitoring therapy: Small spirometry can also be used to monitor the effectiveness of respiratory medications and therapies and to assess the progression of lung diseases. 5. Quick and painless examination: Small spirometry is a quick and non-invasive examination that usually does not cause pain. It provides important information about lung function and can be carried out repeatedly if necessary. Small spirometry is a useful test for evaluating lung function and diagnosing lung diseases. It enables quick and reliable measurement of important lung parameters and is an important instrument in pulmonary diagnostics and therapy.
  • OP release
    Internal surgery clearance, also called preoperative internal medicine assessment, is a process in which an internist evaluates a patient's health status before a planned surgery and gives clearance for the surgical procedure. This assessment is important to minimize surgical risk and ensure that the patient is well prepared for the procedure. Here is some important information about internal surgical clearance: 1. Medical history: a detailed medical history is taken to collect information about the patient's medical history, existing medical conditions, medication use, allergies and previous surgeries. 2. Physical Examination: A thorough physical examination is performed to assess the patient's general health, including vital signs, cardiac and pulmonary function, skin condition and neurological functions. 3. Laboratory tests: Depending on individual risk factors and planned surgery, laboratory tests such as blood tests, electrolyte levels, kidney function tests, blood clotting tests and ECG may be carried out. 4. Medication management: Review the patient's medications taken and decide on the need for medication adjustment before surgery, especially blood thinning medications and other critical medications. 5. Assessment of risk factors: the patient's individual risk of complications during and after the operation is assessed based on the existing health status, previous illnesses and other risk factors. 6. Recommendations and approval: After the assessment, a recommendation for approval for the operation is made, which forms the basis for the operation preparations. If necessary, additional measures or consultations with other specialists may be recommended.
  • Mother-child passport examination
    The mother-child pass is part of the preventive program that is intended to check the health of mothers and children during pregnancy, after birth and in childhood. The mother-child pass includes regular examinations, vaccinations, advice and health care measures to monitor the development of mother and child and to identify health problems at an early stage. Here is some important information about the mother-child passport examination: 1. Prenatal care: The mother-child pass begins during pregnancy and includes regular preventive examinations for the expectant mother, including ultrasound examinations, blood tests, weight control, medical advice and education. 2. Post-natal check-ups: After the child is born, both mother and child undergo regular check-ups as part of the mother-child pass to monitor the health and development of both. This includes, among other things, U-examinations for the child and follow-up examinations for the mother. 3. Vaccinations: The mother-child pass also includes vaccinations for the child according to the vaccination schedule to ensure comprehensive vaccination protection and prevent infectious diseases. 4. Health advice: As part of the mother-child pass, mothers and children also receive comprehensive health advice on topics such as nutrition, exercise, child development, vaccinations, health care and family planning. 5. Early detection of developmental disorders: Through regular examinations as part of the mother-child pass, developmental disorders, health problems or abnormalities can be identified at an early stage and treated accordingly. 6. Documentation and records: The mother-child pass serves as a medical documentation booklet in which all examination results, vaccinations, developmental progress and health data of mother and child are recorded.
  • Vascular occlusion pressure measurement (ABI)
    The ABI measurement stands for "ankle-brachial index" and is a diagnostic procedure for evaluating arterial blood flow in the extremities, especially in the legs. The ABI measures the ratio of ankle blood pressure to upper arm blood pressure and is used to detect circulatory disorders such as peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Here is some important information about ABI measurement: 1. Procedure: During the ABI measurement, blood pressure cuffs are placed on the upper arm and both ankles. Blood pressure is measured sequentially on each arm and both ankles to calculate the ABI. 2. Calculating the ABI: The ABI is calculated by dividing the systolic blood pressure in the ankle by the systolic blood pressure in the upper arm. A low ABI value can indicate a circulatory disorder. 3. Diagnosis of PAD: ABI measurement is used to diagnose PAD and determine the severity of the disease. A low ABI can indicate a narrowing or blockage of the arteries in the legs, which can lead to symptoms such as pain when walking, sores on the legs, and poor wound healing. 4. Risk factors: ABI measurement is particularly important in patients with risk factors for PAD, such as smoking, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity and lack of exercise. These patients have an increased risk of circulatory disorders and PAD. 5. Treatment and management: Based on the ABI results, appropriate treatment measures can be recommended to improve arterial blood flow and slow the progression of PAD. These include measures such as lifestyle changes, medications, physical therapy, or in some cases, interventional therapy or surgery. ABI measurement is an important diagnostic test for assessing arterial blood flow in the legs and diagnosing PAD. Early detection and treatment of circulatory disorders can prevent serious complications and improve the quality of life of those affected.
  • HRV analysis
    The HRV measurement stands for heart rate variability and refers to the variation in the time intervals between successive heartbeats. HRV measurement is used to evaluate the activity of the autonomic nervous system and draw conclusions about the health of the cardiovascular system. Higher HRV is often associated with better health and a more flexible body response to stress. Purpose of HRV measurement: - Assessment of the autonomic nervous system: HRV provides information about the balance between the sympathetic (activating) and parasympathetic (calming) nervous systems. - Health monitoring: Changes in HRV can indicate stress, fatigue, illness or other health conditions. - Training optimization: Athletes and athletes use HRV measurement to adjust their training plan and avoid overtraining. HRV measurement methods: 1. Electrocardiogram (ECG): HRV can be measured by recording the heart's electrical activity through electrodes on the skin. Benefits of HRV measurement: - Early detection of health problems: Changes in HRV can indicate health problems such as cardiovascular disease, stress or sleep disorders. - Individualization of training plans: Athletes can improve their performance and recovery by adjusting their training based on HRV. - Stress management: HRV measurement can help monitor stress levels and optimize relaxation techniques.
  • Look recorder control
    A loop recorder check refers to the inspection and evaluation of an implanted loop recorder, also known as a pacemaker or event recorder. A loop recorder is a small device implanted under the skin to record and monitor cardiac arrhythmias and irregular heartbeats. Monitoring and follow-up care can also be carried out remotely, which means that all registered abnormalities are sent to me directly, without you having to do anything. Here is some important information about loop recorder control: 1. Functional check: A loop recorder check checks the functionality of the implanted device to ensure that it is working properly and effectively detects cardiac arrhythmias. 2. Data evaluation: The stored data from the loop recorder is read and analyzed to obtain information about heart rate, cardiac arrhythmias, arrhythmias and other relevant parameters. 3. Event query: During the check-up, events or symptoms that the patient may have experienced are reviewed to look for possible cardiac arrhythmias or irregularities. 4. Programming optimization: In some cases, the programming of the loop recorder can be adjusted or optimized during control to improve the detection and monitoring of certain cardiac arrhythmias. 5. Battery check: The battery life of the loop recorder is checked to ensure that it is still sufficient and, if necessary, to enable timely planning for a battery replacement. 6. Doctor-patient communication: After the loop recorder check, further steps or measures may be recommended. Loop recorders are helpful devices for monitoring cardiac arrhythmias and diagnosing irregular heartbeats. Regular checks and evaluations of the loop recorder are important to monitor the patient's heart health, make treatment decisions and ensure the best possible care.
  • Pacemaker control (ordination 1050)
    A pacemaker check is a regular check and adjustment of an implanted pacemaker. A pacemaker is a medical device that corrects cardiac arrhythmias and helps the heart beat at a regular rhythm. Pacemaker monitoring is critical to ensure that the pacemaker is functioning properly and optimally matched to the patient's needs. Here is some important information about pacemaker control: 1. Functional check: During a pacemaker check, the functionality of the pacemaker is checked to ensure that it is working correctly and regulating the heart rhythm effectively. 2. Electrode check: The electrodes that are connected to the pacemaker and send signals to the heart are checked for position and function to ensure that the heart is being stimulated optimally. 3. Programming optimization: Depending on the patient's individual needs, the pacemaker's programming can be adjusted or optimized during control to ensure effective treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. 4. Battery check: The battery life of the pacemaker is monitored and checked to ensure that the battery still has sufficient capacity and can be replaced in a timely manner when necessary. 5. Reading data: During pacemaker control, pacemaker data is read and analyzed to obtain information about heart rate, cardiac arrhythmias, battery life and other relevant parameters. 6. Doctor-patient communication: After the pacemaker check, the results are discussed and, if necessary, recommendations or adjustments for further measures are made. Pacemaker monitoring is an important part of the aftercare for patients with an implanted pacemaker. Regular checks and adjustments can ensure optimal function of the pacemaker, monitor the patient's heart health and ensure the best possible treatment.
  • Defibrillator control (ordination 1050)
    A defibrillator check is the regular inspection and maintenance of an implanted defibrillator, also known as an ICD (Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator). A defibrillator is a life-saving medical device that can treat irregular heart rhythms or life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation by delivering an electrical shock to return the heart to a normal rhythm. Here is some important information about defibrillator control: 1. Functional check: The defibrillator check involves checking the functionality of the implanted defibrillator to ensure that it is working properly and can intervene effectively in the event of a life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia. 2. Data reading: During the check, the defibrillator's stored data is read and analyzed to obtain information about cardiac rhythm activity, delivered shocks, battery life and other relevant parameters. 3. Programming optimization: Depending on the individual needs of the patient, the programming of the defibrillator can be adjusted or optimized during control to ensure effective treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. 4. Electrode check: The electrodes that are connected to the defibrillator and deliver the electric shock are checked for position and function to ensure that they work correctly in an emergency. 5. Battery check: The battery life of the defibrillator is monitored and checked to ensure that the battery still has sufficient capacity and can be replaced in a timely manner when necessary. 6. Doctor-patient communication: After the defibrillator check, all findings are discussed and, if necessary, recommendations for further measures or adjustments are made. Regular checks and maintenance of an implanted defibrillator are crucial to ensure the functionality of the device, monitor heart health and initiate life-saving measures in an emergency. Careful inspection and adjustment of the defibrillator can minimize potential risks and improve patient safety.
  • CRT control (ordination 1050)
    A CRT check is the review and optimization of a cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device, also known as a CRT pacemaker or CRT defibrillator. CRT therapy is used in patients with heart failure to improve the coordination of contractions of the heart chambers and to support heart function. Here is some important information about CRT control: 1. Functional check: During a CRT check, the functionality of the CRT device is checked to ensure that it is working properly and supporting the coordination of the heart chambers to improve heart function. 2. Lead check: The leads that are connected to the CRT device and send electrical signals to the heart are checked for position and function to ensure that resynchronization therapy is being delivered effectively. 3. Programming optimization: Depending on individual needs, the programming of the CRT device can be adjusted or optimized during control to further improve cardiac function and synchronization. 4. Data reading: During CRT control, the stored data of the CRT device is read and analyzed to obtain information about heart rate, cardiac arrhythmias, resynchronization effects and other relevant parameters. 5. Battery Check: The battery life of the CRT device is monitored and checked to ensure that the battery still has sufficient capacity and can be replaced in a timely manner when necessary. 6. Doctor-patient communication: After the CRT check, all findings are discussed and, if necessary, recommendations for further measures or adjustments are made. CRT monitoring is an important part of the follow-up care for patients with a CRT device for the treatment of heart failure. Regular checks and adjustments can ensure optimal function of the CRT device, monitor heart health and ensure the best possible therapy.
  • Coronary computed tomography (clinical service)
    Coronary computed tomography (CT) is an imaging technique used to create detailed images of the coronary arteries and heart. This non-invasive examination allows doctors to detect narrowings or blockages in the coronary arteries at an early stage and to assess the risk of heart disease. Purpose of Coronary Computed Tomography (CT): - Detection of coronary artery calcifications: Coronary CT can visualize deposits in the coronary arteries that indicate coronary artery disease (CHD). - Identification of narrowings or blockages: CT can show narrowings or blockages in the coronary arteries and thus assess the risk of heart attacks or other cardiovascular diseases. - Assessment of the heart structure: In addition to the coronary arteries, CT can also show the heart structure, heart valves and heart function. Process of coronary computed tomography (CT): - Preparation: As a rule, no special preparations are required before the examination. The patient will be asked to lie down on a couch and a contrast agent may be administered to better visualize the coronary arteries. - Execution: During the CT scan, the CT scanner moves around the patient's body and creates detailed cross-sectional images of the heart and coronary arteries. - Evaluation: The captured images are evaluated by a radiologist or cardiologist to identify narrowings, blockages or other abnormalities. Benefits of coronary computed tomography (CT): - Early detection of heart disease. - Assess the risk of cardiovascular disease. - Planning treatments or interventions for coronary heart disease. - Monitoring the success of treatment in cardiac patients.
  • Transesophageal echocardiography (clinical service)
    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is a specialized diagnostic procedure used for detailed assessment of cardiac structures and function. Unlike traditional transthoracic echocardiography, the TEE probe is inserted through the esophagus to obtain close-up, high-resolution ultrasound images of the heart. This allows for a more precise representation of certain cardiac structures and a better assessment of heart valves, atria and other regions of the heart. Purpose of Transesophageal Echocardiography (TEE): - Assessment of the heart valves: TEE allows an accurate assessment of the heart valves, especially when valvular diseases such as mitral regurgitation, aortic stenosis or tricuspid regurgitation are suspected. - Detection of blood clots: TEE can detect blood clots in the heart, particularly in the left atrium, which pose an increased risk of stroke. - Diagnosis of congenital heart defects: In congenital heart defects, TEE can help provide accurate information about the anatomy and function of the heart. - Monitoring during surgical procedures: TEE is often used during cardiac surgery to provide surgeons with real-time images of the heart during the procedure. Process of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE): - Preparation: Before the TEE examination, the patient will be fasting and may receive light sedation. A thin, flexible probe is inserted down the esophagus to visualize the heart. - Procedure: During the TEE, the patient will lie on their side and the probe will be carefully passed through the esophagus until it is directly behind the heart. Ultrasound images are generated and recorded. Benefits of Transesophageal Echocardiography (TEE): - Accurate representation of cardiac structures. - Diagnosis and monitoring of heart disease. - Support in planning and carrying out cardiac operations.
  • Electrical cardioversion (clinical service)
    Electrical cardioversion is a medical procedure used to treat cardiac arrhythmias, particularly atrial fibrillation or other life-threatening arrhythmias. Electrical cardioversion involves delivering a controlled electrical discharge to the heart to restore normal heart rhythm. Purpose of electrical cardioversion: - Treatment of atrial fibrillation: Atrial fibrillation is a common heart rhythm disorder in which the atria of the heart beat irregularly and too quickly. Cardioversion is used to restore normal heart rhythm. - Treatment of other life-threatening arrhythmias: Electrical cardioversion can also be used for other life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias such as ventricular tachycardia to correct the heart rhythm. Electrical cardioversion process: - Preparation: Before cardioversion, an electrocardiogram (ECG), blood tests and a medical history are usually carried out. The patient may receive light sedation. - Procedure: The patient is placed on a bed, electrodes are attached to the chest, and a defibrillator or cardioversion device is used to deliver an electrical pulse to the heart. - Monitoring: Heart rhythm is monitored during and after cardioversion to ensure normal heart rhythm has been restored. Benefits of Electric Cardioversion: - Restoration of normal heart rhythm. - Improve heart function. - Reduction of symptoms such as heart palpitations, shortness of breath and fatigue.
  • Loop recorder implantation (clinical service)
    Loop recorder implantation is a medical procedure in which a small device, the loop recorder, is implanted under the skin to continuously record a patient's heart rhythm. Loop recorders are often used in patients with unclear or intermittent symptoms of cardiac arrhythmias to identify the cause of these symptoms and to monitor heart rhythm over time. Purpose of loop recorder implantation: - Diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias: Loop recorders can help monitor unexplained symptoms such as dizziness, fainting or palpitations and identify the underlying cardiac arrhythmia. - Long-term monitoring: Loop recorders can continuously record heart rhythms over several months or even years to detect rare or intermittent arrhythmias. - Treatment adjustment: The recorded data can help doctors determine the appropriate treatment for the patient and adjust drug therapies or other interventions. Loop recorder implantation process: - Preparation: Before implanting a loop recorder, a thorough examination of the patient is performed to determine the indication for the procedure. The procedure is usually carried out under local anesthesia. - Implantation: The loop recorder is usually implanted under the skin in the chest area, often near the breastbone. The device is placed through a small incision and the wound is then stitched up. - Activation and monitoring: After implantation, the loop recorder is activated and begins continuously recording the heart rhythm. The recorded data can be transmitted wirelessly to the treating doctor and evaluated. Benefits of loop recorder implantation: - Diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias with unclear symptoms. - Long-term monitoring of heart rhythm. - Adaptation of treatment for the patient.
  • Pacemaker implantation (clinical service)
    Pacemaker implantation is a medical procedure in which a pacemaker, an electronic device that regulates the heart rhythm, is implanted into the body. A pacemaker is used to treat irregular heartbeats, especially when the heart beats too slowly or has irregular beats. Implanting a pacemaker is a proven procedure to support heart function and reduce the risk of symptoms such as dizziness, fainting or fatigue. Purpose of pacemaker implantation: - Treatment of bradycardia: A pacemaker is implanted when the heart beats too slowly (bradycardia), which can lead to insufficient blood flow and symptoms such as dizziness or fainting. - Stabilizing heart rhythm: A pacemaker helps maintain normal heart rhythm and correct irregular heartbeats. - Improve quality of life: Pacemaker therapy can reduce symptoms such as fatigue and shortness of breath, improving the patient's quality of life. Pacemaker implantation process: - Preparation: Before pacemaker implantation, various examinations are carried out to determine the need and type of pacemaker. The procedure is usually carried out under local or general anesthesia. - Implantation: A pacemaker is surgically implanted under the skin in the chest area. Electrodes are inserted into the heart through a vein and connected to the pacemaker. - Programming and monitoring: After implantation, the pacemaker is programmed to monitor the patient's heart rhythm and deliver electrical pulses when necessary. The patient is monitored regularly to check the pacemaker's function. Benefits of pacemaker implantation: - Regulation of heart rhythm. - Improvement of symptoms of cardiac arrhythmias. - Prolongation and improvement of quality of life.
  • Defibrillator implantation (clinical service)
    Defibrillator implantation, also known as an ICD (implantable cardioverter defibrillator), is a medical procedure in which an electronic device is implanted under the skin to treat life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. An ICD continuously monitors the heart's rhythm and delivers electrical shocks when necessary to stop dangerous arrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation and return the heart to a normal rhythm. ICD implantation is an important measure to prevent sudden cardiac death in patients at high risk of life-threatening arrhythmias. Purpose of ICD implantation: - Treatment of life-threatening arrhythmias: An ICD is implanted to detect and treat potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia. - Prevention of sudden cardiac death: The ICD can deliver life-saving shocks to defibrillate the heart and prevent sudden cardiac death. - Continuous monitoring: The ICD continuously monitors the heart rhythm and can also record data about arrhythmias that can later be evaluated by the doctor. ICD implantation process: - Preparation: Before ICD implantation, various examinations are carried out to determine the need and type of ICD. The procedure is usually carried out under local or general anesthesia. - Implantation: The ICD is surgically implanted under the skin in the chest area. Electrodes are passed through veins into the heart and connected to the ICD. - Programming and monitoring: After implantation, the ICD is programmed to monitor the heart rhythm and deliver shocks if necessary. The patient is monitored regularly to check the function of the ICD. Benefits of ICD implantation: - Treatment and prevention of life-threatening arrhythmias. - Reducing the risk of sudden cardiac death. - Continuous heart rhythm monitoring.
  • CRT implantation (clinical service)
    CRT implantation stands for “Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy” and refers to the implantation of a special device used to treat heart failure. CRT therapy is often performed in conjunction with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and aims to improve the coordination of the heart chambers and support heart function. This therapy is particularly suitable for patients with heart failure and a specific type of cardiac arrhythmia (left bundle branch block). Purpose of CRT implantation: - Improve cardiac function: CRT therapy helps promote synchronized contraction of the heart chambers and optimize the heart's pumping function. - Reduction of symptoms: By coordinating the heart chambers, symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue and fluid retention can be reduced. - Prevention of heart failure worsening: CRT can slow the progression of heart failure and reduce hospitalizations. CRT implantation process: - Preparation: Before CRT implantation, various tests are performed to determine the indication and optimal placement of the electrodes. The procedure is usually carried out under local or general anesthesia. - Implantation: A special device (CRT pacemaker) is surgically implanted under the skin in the chest area. Electrodes are passed through veins into the heart and placed at specific locations to synchronize the heart chambers. - Programming and monitoring: After implantation, the CRT device is programmed to monitor heart function and deliver electrical pulses when necessary. The patient is monitored regularly to check the function of the device. Benefits of CRT implantation: - Improve heart function and pumping ability. - Reduction of symptoms of heart failure. - Slowing the progression of heart failure.
  • PFO closure (clinical service)
    PFO closure is a minimally invasive procedure used to treat a patent foramen ovale (PFO), a congenital heart malformation in which a hole between the two atria of the heart is not completely closed. A patent PFO can lead to unwanted blood flow between the atria and increase the risk of stroke or migraine attacks. The PFO closure aims to close the hole and reduce the risks. Purpose of PFO closure: - Reducing the risk of stroke: An open PFO can allow blood clots to travel from the venous to the arterial circulation, causing a stroke. The PFO closure is intended to minimize this risk. Process of PFO closure: - Preparation: Before PFO closure, imaging tests such as a transesophageal echocardiogram will be performed to determine the exact location of the PFO. The procedure is usually carried out under local or general anesthesia. - Procedure: A special catheter is advanced to the heart via the groin artery or jugular vein to reach the PFO. A closure device is placed through the catheter to close the hole. - Monitoring: After the procedure, the patient will be monitored to detect possible complications. Most patients are able to go home shortly after the procedure. Benefits of PFO closure: - Reducing the risk of stroke in selected patients.
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